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A women’s gathering for equal rights

SHA Kaleo - Tue, 02/06/2018 - 2:25pm

On Jan. 21, crowds of people gathered from 10 a.m. at the Hawaii State Capitol to march for women’s rights.

The 2nd Annual Women’s March began with speakers, which then later commenced to the actual march. From the State Capitol, the ambitious advocates marched along Richards Street, passing South Beretania Street and returning to the starting point.

The march was created on Facebook last year by Maui local Teresa Shook. This page along with several other pages linked within it gave marchers more information on the itinerary of both the Hawai’i State Capitol march and several other marches throughout the nation of America.

Protesters followed Shook and marched to fight against President Donald Trump’s inauguration. According to marchers, they are protesting against the President’s action and words throughout social media, demean women and other minority groups.

Women and men across America stood against the inequality of women who are still deprived of their rights today.

After the #metoo movement, which demonstrated a widespread problem of sexual harassment and assault, countless more are speaking up to the power imbalance not only in Hollywood but also for the everyday American women who are not given equal rights and respect.

“Don’t be afraid to speak your truth and have your own opinions,” Sacred Hearts Academy English teacher Chloe Smith said. “If you believe passionately about something, believe in that passion and speak that passion and find something that you value.”

Welcoming in the new year with calligraphy

SHA Kaleo - Tue, 01/23/2018 - 11:30am

While some classes at the Academy are diving straight into coursework and reviewing lessons from last semester, the Japanese II-V and Advanced Placement (AP) classes spent the first week of the second semester learning Japanese calligraphy.

The practice, called shuji, is the art of writing Japanese characters in an artistic way using a traditional calligraphy brush and washi paper.

Students were first given newspaper to practice simple characters such as the number one, two, river and water for the first class. Around the classroom were examples that showed the stroke order for each character, as well as which direction each stroke went.

Then using a skinnier brush, students practiced writing their names in Japanese so that they could sign their piece.

“I thought the class was very educational because we get to learn about the different Japanese writing styles,” junior Tyra-Marie Tabayoyong said. “I thought it was going to be easy because it’s almost like painting, but there is so much more to it, such as, the different line endings and the thickness of the stroke.”

The second day of class, students were then given five pieces of washi paper to write the character for dog, since 2018 is the year of the dog, according to the Chinese Zodiac calendar.

Academy students learn about Japanese culture at an annual festival

SHA Kaleo - Tue, 01/23/2018 - 11:25am

While most students spent the recent three-day weekend sleeping in or going to the beach, Sacred Hearts Academy’s Japanese III Honors students volunteered at the annual New Year’s Ohana Festival. The event was held at the Japanese Culture Center of Hawaii and across the street at the Moiliili Neighborhood Park.

The event is made up of food vendors, Japanese cultural activities and games. Throughout the day, there were various performances and demonstrations put on at either the park stage or building stage.

Some of the performances included Taiko drum demonstrations by the Taiko Center of the Pacific and a musical performance by the Royal Hawaiian Band.

“The event was just filled with so much culture and…passion (through performances),” junior and volunteer Ragelle Lumapas said.

The Academy students were assigned to specific stations, where they handed out booklets that included the day’s festivities, as well as a map of the event.

Each group of students were also allotted a 30-minute break to enjoy the different vendors and festivities. They also had the opportunity to tour the Center’s Okage Sama De exhibit. The exhibit, which translates to, “I am what I am because of you,” features the history of Japanese immigrants to Hawaii and gives visitors a look into the past.

To conclude the eight-hour service, students were provided with a free lunch and allowed to participate in the rest of the event’s activities.

Ballistic missile threat sends Hawaii into a state of fear

SHA Kaleo - Sat, 01/13/2018 - 12:42pm

Students and residents of Hawaii woke up to an alert from Hawaii’s Emergency Management Agency stating that a ballistic missile threat was coming to Hawaii. About 30 minutes later, another alert was sent out stating that the threat alert was an error and that there was no danger to the state.

“It was a terrifying way to wake up. My little sister and I were both asleep when the alarm first sounded and at first we were both just confused,” senior Taylor McKenzie said. “My mom was going to drive (my family) to the military base after receiving the message.”

Officials from Hawaii Emergency Management agency say that if an alert, like this, was sent out, residents of Hawaii would only have 15 minutes to take shelter.

For many students, the alarm was a frightening disruption of weekend activities.

Junior Rebecca Meyer was at a canoe paddling race when the threat alert was sent out.  

“I was in the middle of going out to my race and all of a sudden all the paddlers were getting out of the canoes and climbing out of the water. It was so surreal to see everyone running,” said Meyer. “Some of my friends (who were paddling with her) were being grabbed by their parents.”

Approximately 30 minutes after the false alarm was sent to phones, both local and national news outlets released more information on the false threat. Hawaii News Now was one of the first local news organizations to reveal that the alert was false. State officials such as, House Representative, Tulsi Gabbard, took to social media to inform the public that there was no missile threat to Hawaii.

News of the threat pervaded Twitter and many other social media services. Many Hawaii residents were trying to find shelter, believing that it was not a test. Many were left in anger that it took a long time to respond to this mistake and that it happened in the first place.

Governor David Ige and the head of Hawaii’s Emergency Management Agency said the ‘threat button’ was pressed accidentally and blamed the mistake on human error.

A win for the Iconic Alert Squad

SHA Kaleo - Tue, 12/26/2017 - 11:30pm

Sacred Hearts Academy’s lower school robotics team is best in the state.

The Iconic Alert Squad, otherwise known as the Lower School First Lego League (FLL) robotics team, placed first at the Kalani District Tournament in November.

They will be the only school to represent Hawaii at the 2018 FLL World Championship in Texas later this school year.

The team scored well in all four categories (core values, robot performance, project and robot design). They also won an award for Core Values Teamwork.

They Alert Squad earned their victory for their work on this year’s FLL challenge, “Hydro Dynamics.” This challenged them to solve a real-world problem surrounding water sourcing, its delivery system and usage.

They competed against 12 other teams at the Kalani District Tournament.

FLL challenges require students to apply science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) concepts to their robot in order to create their solution to the problem given.

From there, they must design, build and program a robot using LEGO MINDSTORMS technology and compete against other teams on a table-top playing field.

The team consists of five sixth graders: Abegail Aguirre, Victoria Fang-Yee, Madison Iwashita, Cadence Kasprick and Reese Machida.

A win for the Iconic Alert Squad

SHA Kaleo - Wed, 12/20/2017 - 9:26pm

Sacred Hearts Academy’s lower school robotics team is best in the state.

The Iconic Alert Squad, otherwise known as the Lower School First Lego League (FLL) robotics team, placed first at the Kalani District Tournament in November.

They will be the only school to represent Hawaii at the 2018 FLL World Championship in Texas later this school year.

The team scored well in all four categories (core values, robot performance, project and robot design). They also won an award for Core Values Teamwork.

They Alert Squad earned their victory for their work on this year’s FLL challenge, “Hydro Dynamics.” This challenged them to solve a real-world problem surrounding water sourcing, its delivery system and usage.

They competed against 12 other teams at the Kalani District Tournament.

FLL challenges require students to apply science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) concepts to their robot in order to create their solution to the problem given.

From there, they must design, build and program a robot using LEGO MINDSTORMS technology and compete against other teams on a table-top playing field.

The team consists of five sixth graders: Abegail Aguirre, Victoria Fang-Yee, Madison Iwashita, Cadence Kasprick and Reese Machida.

Marching band gets new exposure after a canceled parade

SHA Kaleo - Mon, 12/18/2017 - 9:04am

Every year, members of the Sacred Hearts Academy marching band spend months preparing for three major parades on Oahu. This year, however, students only had the opportunity to march in two.

Due to bad weather in November, the 71st Veterans Day parade in Wahiawa was canceled. Members of the band had arrived to the parade, dressed and ready to perform, but said they were extremely disappointed when they discovered it had been canceled.

“It was (another section leader’s) idea to play anyway,” drum major, trumpet section leader and senior Kacey Chong said. “When we did play, I felt like everyone’s spirits were lifted, even though the parade was canceled.”

Despite the band not being able to march the parade route, they made their mark by performing “Patriotic Parade Sequence” and “Shut Up and Dance with Me” at a nearby parade venue.

Marching band students were able to perform the two songs, along with the “Christmas Parade Sequence,” which was also performed at this year’s Grandparents Day. The annual event invites students’ grandparents to attend school with their granddaughters for the day.

“I was very grateful when (Head of School) Mrs. (Betty) White and the sisters of Sacred Hearts let us perform,” band director Keith Higaki said. “In an email, Mrs. White said that this may have been the best Grandparents Day.”

More than 40 band students came to school to perform for parents and prospective students on Nov. 18 for an open house as well.

“(Open House) was another big success,” Higaki said. “The parents, students and faculty were really excited to see the band perform.”

After performing for the school, the band returned to the streets for the annual Waikiki Christmas Parade. The nighttime parade is 1.1 miles long. The Academy was one of 11 high school bands participating.

“It was nice to talk to other band members in different schools to bond with them, sharing our similar interests,” Chong said. “Even though it rained slightly during the parade, the band was able to play with good tone, and they sustained their stamina.”

The marching band will have their last parade on Dec. 7 in Kaimuki, which will be held on Waialae Avenue starting from Saint Louis School.

Senior Kacey Chong poses with trumpet players as they wait for the Wahiawa parade to start. Photos courtesy of Brian Wong.

Leo or Leona the Lion

The Lancer Blog - Thu, 11/16/2017 - 12:13pm

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